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Waste: reduce, reuse, recycle

A Green Future

We are all working together to protect our environment, end our contribution to climate change and benefit from the wealth of the natural and economic opportunities we have in North Lincolnshire. Read more about A Green Future, what the council is doing and what you can do to contribute to protecting our environment. Make a pledge to show your commitment. It doesn’t matter how big or small, all changes add up to a big impact.

The Waste Hierarchy…because we don’t have a Planet B…

The waste hierarchy is a simple ranking system used for the different waste management options according to which is best for the environment. The preferred option is to prevent things becoming waste in the first place. The next best option is to, where possible, prioritise reusing products and materials before it becomes waste.

Simply put, waste causes pollution, contributes to climate change and uses more money, energy and natural resources than most of us realise. Making small changes in our everyday lives can make a powerful difference to the planet we call home. See below for our A-Z of how to reduce waste and reuse materials…

Image showing Waste Hierarchy. Reduce is top level, Reuse is next level, Recycle is next level, Recovery is next level and finally Disposal is bottom level.

Reduce

When we take action to prevent waste arising in the first place, there is simply less waste. Less waste means less need to reuse products and more importantly, less waste for disposal. We can prevent waste by using fewer and avoiding unnecessary materials during the design, manufacturing and packaging of products.

A-Z

When we take action to prevent waste arising in the first place, there is simply less waste. Less waste means less need to reuse products and more importantly, less waste for disposal. We can prevent waste by using fewer and avoiding unnecessary materials during the design, manufacturing and packaging of products.

A

Avoid single use plastic – these products should be avoided wherever possible – use reusable drinks bottles, flasks, coffee cups, cutlery, straws and stirrers.

B

Best Before date – by eating food that is past its best before (but not its use by) date, we can reduce food waste and save money. Trust your senses when it comes to best before dates!

Bulk buying long lasting items like washing powder, pasta, cereal and biscuits will minimise packaging waste.

Batteries which can be recharged produce less waste because they can be reused many times. They also use less energy because recharging batteries is more energy efficient than the cost and energy of making new batteries.

Bags – take your own shopping bags with you when you go shopping.

C

Community Fridges – are places for everyone to save and share surplus food for free.

Find your nearest, set up your own or learn more at Community Fridges | Hubbub Foundation

Cling film – beeswax sandwich wraps are a reusable alternative to cling film. They are self-sealing, easy to clean, last for at least a year and can be rewaxed to make them last even longer.

Christmas trees – Real Christmas trees are always the best and greenest option, as opposed to artificial trees which are made from a combination of materials and therefore cannot be recycled. If you do opt for an artificial tree, make sure you buy one which can be reused every year to minimise waste and if you decide that you no longer want it, consider donating it to a charity shop.

D

E

E-books and E-audio – North Lincolnshire libraries have launched BorrowBox, a new free e-book and e-audio service available seven days a week, 24 hours a day. The service can be accessed at the BorrowBox page.

F

Food waste – for advice on food storage solutions, portion planning, recipe ideas and cutting down on food waste – see the Food Waste page.

Fashion – fast fashion is the term used to describe the mass production and quick turnaround of cheap and low-quality clothes in line with catwalk fashion, enabling consumers to keep up with changing trends at affordable prices. The main problem associated with fast fashion is the creation of such clothing comes at a large environmental cost and encourages over-consumption, meaning items are worn only a few times before they are thrown away. Love your clothes have put together a handy Donation Generation clothes swap pack containing poster templates and upcycling activity ideas to create your own clothes swap event.

G

Green waste – composting provides a soil fertiliser whilst reducing disposal costs and creating a valuable usable product.

Go Local – buying at your local market or farmers market often means less waste in the form of packaging and less waste in the cost of emissions for transportation. Why not take your own reusable fabric bags or boxes to take your produce home. To find your local market visit the Shop at North Lincolnshire’s Markets page.

H

Use handkerchiefs rather than throwaway tissues.

I

J

Junk mail – stop unsolicited mail and help the environment by reducing paper waste. The Mailing Preference Service (MPS) is a free service which enables customers to have their names and home addresses, in the UK, removed from mailing lists used by the industry. To register visit www.mpsonline.org.uk or telephone 0845 7034599.

K

Kitchen waste – uncooked fruit and vegetable waste can be home composted or you could consider buying a special composter which can compost all your garden and kitchen waste including cooked and uncooked food. Visit the Get Composting website for more ideas.

L

Library books – borrowing books creates a sharing economy that cuts down on consumption and the waste it causes.

Light bulbs – buy long-lasting, low energy light bulbs are more energy efficient and last longer.

M

Milk – glass milk bottles are a greener alternative because glass is 100% recyclable and can be recycled endlessly into new glass bottles or jars.
Menstrual products – conventional menstrual pads contain a significant amount of plastic. Scientists say that a regular nonorganic menstrual pad can take 500 to 800 years to break down. There are several eco-friendly menstrual products available including menstrual cups, period underwear and reusable menstrual pads. Eco-friendly menstrual products may seem expensive at first but investing in reusable products ends up being cheaper than repeatedly buying boxes of tampons or menstrual pads.

N

Nappies – reusable nappies are a much more cost effective and environmentally friendly option than disposable nappies. They’re also more likely to be made of natural soft fibres, which may be better for your baby’s skin and, including the cost of water and electricity for washing them, they still work out cheaper than disposable nappies.

Newspapers and magazines – The online library service allows free access to over 7,000 newspapers and magazines – many with audio, translate and caption features, and some with back copies available.

O

P

Go Paperless – opt out of junk mail lists, sign up for e-statements, pay bills online, digitalize your documents, use a tablet or phone for notes, digitalize your signature, and don’t print anything unnecessarily such as tickets.

Q

R

Repair – take care of your belongings with regular maintenance and repair products to extend their life.
Rent or borrow equipment which you use infrequently. It may be possible to share items such as lawnmowers, shredders, hedge-trimmers or other equipment with your friends or neighbours.
Razors – while not quite ‘single’ use plastic, the average disposable razor only stays sharp for 6-9 shaves, which means if you use one to shave daily, you’ll be throwing away 40-50 razors a year. Typically made from durable materials like brass, stainless steel or bamboo, safety razor handles can last for 10 years or more. Only the blades need to be replaced and these can be recycled.

S

Single use plastic should be avoided wherever possible – use reusable drinks bottles, flasks, coffee cups, cutlery, straws and stirrers.
Soap/shampoo – hand/body wash and shampoo can be replaced with bar soap and shampoo bars, eliminating the need for a disposable plastic bottle and the non-recyclable pump that comes with it.

T

Toys – used toys can be donated to charity shops, sold, or given away. Alternatively, host a swapping event with friends, family and neighbours as often toys are in perfectly good condition, but children are bored with them.

U

V

W

Wrapping paper – buy presents that don’t need to be wrapped, such as vouchers and experience gifts. Preferably, don’t use paper at all, put it in a box which can be used again and again. If you must use paper, plan the amount of paper you need and make sure it can be recycled in your blue box. Avoid paper that is made from plastic or aluminium and paper with glitter which is almost impossible to remove in the recycling process. If in doubt do the ‘scrunch’ test – if it stays scrunched, it can be recycled.
Wipes can be replaced by reusable, washable cloths.

X

Xmas trees – Real Xmas trees are always the best and greenest option, as opposed to artificial trees which are made from a combination of materials and therefore cannot be recycled. If you do opt for an artificial tree, make sure you buy one which can be reused every year to minimise waste and if you decide that you no longer want it, consider donating it to a charity shop.

Y

Z

Zero waste shops – the whole point of a zero waste shop is to cut down on packaging primarily, but also food waste. Shoppers take their own tubs or bags along and buy just what they need. Initially these shops only sold dried goods like pasta, nuts, seeds and pulses, but as demand for this type of shopping has increased you can now buy washing up liquid, washing powder, and toiletries in most shops.

Visit our dedicated home composting page to learn how to compost at home and to see our latest offers on compost bins. Learn about the benefits to you, your garden and the environment.

The Love Food Hate Waste campaign is a national initiative aimed at getting us all to avoid wasting food. The website provides advice on using leftover food, date labels and the best ways to store food, plus much more.

Reuse

By cleaning, repairing and refurbishing items, we can significantly increase the number of things we reuse.

Reusing is better than recycling because it saves the energy that comes with having to dismantle and re-manufacture products. It also significantly reduces waste and pollution because it reduces the need for raw materials, saving both forests and water supplies. As more single-use products are being phased out for reusable alternatives, re-using things is more accessible now, than ever before.

Reuse A-Z

A

B

Beeswax sandwich wraps – these are a reusable alternative to clingfilm. They are self-sealing, easy to clean, last for at least a year and can be rewaxed to make them last even longer.

Bric-a-brac – unwanted bric-a-brac/reusable items can be donated for reuse at the Household Recycling Centres. Simply present items to a site attendant who will determine what is suitable for the reuse scheme. You can also donate items through the furniture reuse scheme.

Batteries – rechargeable batteries produce less waste because they can be recharged and reused hundreds of times. They also use less energy because recharging batteries is more energy efficient than the cost and energy of making new batteries.

C

Ceramics – unwanted ceramics and china can be donated to local charity shops. Alternatively, broken ceramics and china can be used for drainage in plant pots.

Clothing and curtains – can be donated to local charity shops.

Christmas trees – Real Christmas trees are always the best and greenest option, as opposed to artificial trees which are made from a combination of materials and therefore cannot be recycled. If you do opt for an artificial tree, make sure you buy one which can be reused every year to minimise waste and if you decide that you no longer want it, consider donating it to a charity shop.

D

Drinks – make fresh, homemade drinks in reusable, re-sealable containers, rather than buying separate cartons, cans and bottles.

E

Electrical items which are still in good condition can be donated to our furniture reuse schemes so that they can be reused by someone else.

F

Food waste – uncooked fruit and vegetable waste can be home composted. Consider buying a special composter which can compost all garden and kitchen waste including cooked and uncooked food. www.getcomposting.com
Furniture which is still in good condition please see our furniture reuse schemes page for information on how it can be reused by someone else. If damaged, you could repair and upcycle your furniture or it can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres for disposal or recycling or collected by our bulky collection service.

Freegle is a UK organisation that aims to increase reuse and reduce landfill by offering a free Internet-based service where people can give away and ask for things that would otherwise be thrown away. Visit the Freegle website.

G

Green waste – composting provides a soil fertiliser whilst reducing disposal costs and creating a valuable usable product.

Go Local – buying at your local market or farmers market often means less waste in the form of packaging and less waste in the cost of emissions for transportation. Why not take your own reusable fabric bags or boxes to take your produce home. To find your local market visit the Shop at North Lincolnshire’s Markets page.

H

I

Inkjet cartridges – check if your toner cartridges can be returned to the manufacturer for refilling and reuse or refill them yourself.

J

Junk mail – stop unsolicited mail and help the environment by reducing paper waste. The Mailing Preference Service (MPS) is a free service which enables customers to have their names and home addresses, in the UK, removed from mailing lists used by the industry. To register visit www.mpsonline.org.uk or telephone 0845 7034599.

K

Kitchen waste – uncooked fruit and vegetable waste can be home composted. Consider buying a special composter which can compost all garden and kitchen waste including cooked and uncooked food. www.getcomposting.com

L

Library books – borrowing books creates a sharing economy that cuts down on consumption and the waste it causes.

M

Milk – buy milk in reusable glass bottles from a milkman, rather than plastic bottles or cartons. Glass milk bottles are a greener alternative because glass is 100% recyclable and can be recycled endlessly into new glass bottles or jars. The more recycled glass we use to make new glass, the less raw materials the industry needs to use to produce glass.

Mirrors – if in one-piece, unwanted mirrors can be donated to a local charity shop. Broken mirrors should not be placed in the green box and should instead be put into your general waste bin.

Musical instruments can’t be recycled but can be donated to your local charity shop, advertised for sale, or offered free to a good home. Oxfam is one charity shop that has a network of specialist music shops. which will accept donations of unwanted musical instruments and sheet music. Alternatively these could be recycled along with the reusable items at the Household Recycling Centres.

N

Nappies – reusable nappies are a much more cost effective and environmentally friendly option than disposable nappies. Including the cost of water and electricity for washing them, they still work out cheaper than disposable nappies.

O

Oil – not all methods of cooking use oil, try alternatives to frying – grill, bake, steam, poach or slow cook instead. Measure out how much cooking oil you use rather than pouring liberally into the pan, some foods release fat when they cook so start by adding a small amount and only add more if you need to.

P

Packaging – consider the packaging that foods are contained in. Buy loose fruit and vegetables, rather than pre-packaged ones and buy long lasting items like washing powder, pasta, cereal and biscuits in bulk to minimise packaging waste.

Picnics and packed lunches should be packed in a reusable airtight container, rather than aluminium foil or cling film wrapping.

Paint – make sure you know how many metres you are going to be painting and check the information on the paint pot to see how much coverage it will give. Remember to close the lid properly to help keep your paint in good condition for longer and donate any unused paint to a Community Re-Paint scheme or local group if they need it.

Q

Quilts – quilts cannot be recycled in the textile banks across the area. Quilts can be donated to your local charity shop or animal shelter.

R

Repair – take care of your belongings with regular maintenance and repair products to extend their life.

S

Spectacles – all of our Household Recycling Centres can accept spectacles in their cases for reuse.  We have teamed up with Vision Aid, a charity dedicated to eye care for developing countries to reuse spectacles.

Soap – hand/body wash can be replaced with bar soap, eliminating the need for a disposable plastic bottle and the non-recyclable pump that comes with it.

T

Toys – used toys can be donated to charity shops, sold, or given away. Alternatively, host a swapping event with friends, family and neighbours, as often toys are in perfectly good condition, but children are bored with them.

U

Understanding environmental impact – reducing and reusing reduces greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global climate change. This helps sustain the environment for future generations, reduces the amount of waste that will need to be recycled or sent to landfills and incinerators and allows products to be used to their fullest extent.

V

W

Walking aids – if these are on loan, please return to the hospital or surgery. If you have purchased these, take to the Household Recycling Centre and show it to a site attendant who will decide if it is suitable for the reuse scheme. If it is not suitable you will be able to leave it at the site for disposal.

Wheelchairs – if these are on loan, please return to the hospital or surgery. If you have purchased this, take to the Household Recycling Centre and show it to a site attendant who will decide if it is suitable for the reuse scheme. If it is not suitable you will be able to leave it at the site for disposal.

Wrapping paper – preferably, don’t use paper at all, buy presents that don’t need to be wrapped, such as vouchers and experience gifts or put them in a box which can be used again and again. If you must use paper, plan the amount of paper you need and make sure it can be recycled in your blue box. Avoid paper that is made from plastic or aluminium and paper with glitter which is almost impossible to remove in the recycling process. If in doubt do the ‘scrunch’ test – if it stays scrunched, it can be recycled.

X

Xmas trees – Real Xmas trees are always the best and greenest option, as opposed to artificial trees which are made from a combination of materials and therefore cannot be recycled. If you do opt for an artificial tree, make sure you buy one which can be reused every year to minimise waste and if you decide that you no longer want it, consider donating it to a charity shop.

Y

Yoghurt pots can be reused as plant pots, children’s paint pots or for school projects.

Z

Zips – unwanted zips and sewing accessories can be donated to your local charity shop.

We want to encourage residents to take advantage of these schemes in order to maximise reuse and reduce the amount of waste going to landfill. Please see below for more information on the reuse schemes in our area.

Some things to think about when you contact any of the furniture reuse groups to request a collection are:

  • are the items in good or reasonable condition and fit for reuse?
  • if the items are soft furnishings, for example settees and mattresses, do they have a fire label attached to them? If not, they cannot be reused by the groups
  • if the item is electrical, is it in good working order? If not, it cannot be reused by the groups

British Heart Foundation

A free collection service for any good quality furniture and electrical items within North Lincolnshire.

Collection will normally be made within three working days and you will be advised of your collection day when you call.

If you are not at home on your collection day the items will need to be left outside (preferably covered up) with a note confirming that it is for donation to the British Heart Foundation scheme.

If you are at home on collection day, the items will be collected from inside your property.

The items collected are sold at the shop in Scunthorpe and all proceeds go towards preventing and fighting heart disease.

To request a collection from the British Heart Foundation call 01724 245410.

Alternatively you can request a BHF collection online.

British Heart Foundation can also arrange house clearance for a charge.

Sue Ryder

A free collection service for any good quality furniture within North Lincolnshire.

All items collected are sold in the Sue Ryder shop.

To request a collection from the Sue Ryder shop, call 01724 848643 and you will be advised of your collection day.

Alternatively you can request a Sue Ryder collection online.

Crosby Community Association

A free collection service for any good quality furniture within North Lincolnshire.
To request a collection from the Crosby Community Association call 01724 330022 and you will be advised of your collection day over the phone.

Crosby Community Association can also arrange house clearances.

Charity shops

There are a variety of charity shops throughout North Lincolnshire that are able to take reusable items such as clothes, shoes, bric-a-brac, music, books and homewares.

Disclaimer

The reuse groups listed are not under the control of North Lincolnshire Council. We have no control over the nature, content or availability of their services.

The inclusion of any links or logo does not necessarily imply a recommendation of the service or endorse the views expressed in any literature or website published by the reuse groups.

In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage arising out of, or in connection with, the use of these services including, without limitation, any indirect or consequential loss or damage.

Recycle

Recycling is the process of collecting and processing materials that would otherwise be thrown away and turning them into new products. It reduces the need for extracting, refining and processing raw materials all of which create substantial air and water pollution. As recycling saves energy, it also reduces greenhouse gas emissions, which helps to tackle climate change. Please use this guide to find out where and how to recycle materials and products which cannot be reused.

Recycling is the process of collecting and processing materials that would otherwise be thrown away and turning them into new products. It reduces the need for extracting, refining and processing raw materials all of which create substantial air and water pollution.

As recycling saves energy, it also reduces greenhouse gas emissions, which helps to tackle climate change. Please use this guide to find out where and how to recycle materials and products which cannot be reused.

A is for:

  • Aerosols – aerosols can be recycled in your green box or taken to one of the can banks across the area. Please make sure that aerosols are completely empty with the lid and plastic nozzle removed if possible. Never attempt to puncture, crush or burn an aerosol can.
  • Aluminium cans and foil – cans and clean foil can be recycled in your green box or taken to one of the can banks across the area. We are unable to accept foiled pouches – please use this link to find out where these can be recycled locally.
    recycle now locator tool
  • Ash – wood ash can be recycled in a home composter. Ash from a solid fuel fire cannot be recycled or composted and should be disposed of in your general waste bin. Wait until ash has cooled before putting into your bin.

B is for:

  • Batteries – household batteries can be recycled in a clear plastic bag placed on top of your green box or at many shops and supermarkets across the area which sell batteries. They can also be recycled in a separate container at the Household Recycling Centres, please ask the site attendants for assistance. Car batteries can also be taken to the Household Recycling Centres, see car batteries for more information. Batteries should never be put in the general waste bin.
  • Bedding and blankets – these can be recycled at the Household Recycling Centres or at any of the textile banks across the area. We are unable to accept duvets and pillows but Dunelm operate a textile take back recycling scheme in most of their stores where they accept clean home textiles including duvets and pillows. Check their Textile Take Back Scheme FAQ page to view a list of participating stores.
  • Bicycles – bicycles can be recycled at the Household Recycling Centres. Bicycle tyres and inner tubes can also be recycled with tyres but at no extra cost.
  • Books – books can be recycled in the book banks at the Household Recycling Centres no matter what their condition. Damaged books can be recycled by separating the pages from the cover and spine, the pages can be recycled in your blue box and the cardboard cover in your burgundy bin.
  • Brita water filter cartridges – Brita have placed recycling bins in high street stores where their products are sold such as Argos and Tesco. Please visit the Brita website to locate your nearest recycling point. Other water filter products are available, however not all will be recyclable. Please check with individual manufacturers.

C is for:

  • Cans – aluminium and steel cans can be recycled in your green box or in one of the can banks across the area.
  • Car batteries – car batteries can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres where they are collected for recycling.
  • Cardboard – cardboard can be recycled in your burgundy bin or at the Household Recycling Centres. We do not accept cardboard containers with a metal base; these will need to go into your general waste bin.
  • Cards – greeting cards can be recycled in your burgundy bin or at the Household Recycling Centres but please remove any parts that contain plastic, glitter, batteries, electronics or any other embellishments before recycling.
  • Cartons – food and drink cartons, for example, soup, juice and milk, can be recycled in your burgundy bin or at the Household Recycling Centres.
  • Carrier bags –carrier bags can be taken to some supermarkets for recycling. Please do not put carrier bags in your burgundy bin as we cannot recycle them.
  • CDs and DVDs – unwanted CDs and DVDs can be recycled in the British Heart Foundation recycling banks at the Household Recycling Centres.
  • Christmas Lights – Christmas lights can be presented with your kerbside boxes for recycling.
  • Clothing – clean, unwanted clothing can be recycled at the Household Recycling Centres or the textile banks across the area.
  • Computers – unwanted computers can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres for recycling. For peace of mind please delete all personal information beforehand.
  • Curtains – unwanted curtains can be recycled at the Household Recycling Centres or the textile banks across the area.
  • Coffee pods and capsules – the single-use pods used in many coffee machines can be recycled through a nationwide coffee pod recycling service called Podback set up and funded by the leading coffee pod systems. Podback offers a local drop-off service through Collect + by Yodel, and kerbside collections are available in some local authority areas. Currently, pods from 11 coffee brands including Nespresso, Nescafé Dolce Gusto, Tassimo, L’OR and CRU Kafe can be recycled through Podback. For more information on the service available in your area visit www.podback.org

D is for:

  • DVDs and CDs – unwanted DVDs and CDs can be recycled in the British Heart Foundation recycling banks at the Household Recycling Centres

E is for:

  • Egg boxes – cardboard egg boxes can be recycled in your burgundy bin, in the cardboard skip at the Household Recycling Centres or in your home compost bin. Egg boxes which are made from plastic can be recycled in your burgundy bin but polystyrene egg boxes cannot easily be recycled.
  • Eggshells – eggshells can be recycled in your home compost bin or alternatively disposed of in your general waste bin. We do not accept eggshells in the brown bin.
  • Electrical items – large and small electrical appliances can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres for recycling. Small appliances with a plug, cable or batteries can be presented with your kerbside boxes for recycling. The batteries can be recycled in a clear plastic bag placed on top of your green box or at many shops and supermarkets across the area which sell batteries. They can also be recycled in a separate container at the Household Recycling Centres. Batteries should never be put in the general waste bin.
  • Envelopes – plastic windows and adhesive strips on envelopes contaminate the recycling process. Residents are, therefore, asked not to recycle envelopes in their blue box or the paper banks across the area unless they are willing to remove the sticky adhesive strip and plastic window before recycling the remainder of the envelope.

F is for:

  • Foil – clean aluminium foil can be recycled in your green box or taken to one of the can banks across the area. We are unable to accept foiled pouches – please use this link to find out where these can be recycled locally. recycle now locator tool
  • Food – uncooked fruit and vegetable waste including peelings can be placed into your home compost bin. If you are unable to compost at home this waste should be disposed of as general waste and not in your brown bin. Alternatively, you could consider buying a special food waste digester which can compost all garden and kitchen food waste including cooked food, fish, bones and bread.
  • Fridges and freezers – these can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres for recycling.
  • Fruit – uncooked fruit waste, including peelings, can be placed into your home compost bin. If you are unable to compost at home this waste should be disposed of as general waste and not in your brown bin.
  • Fluorescent tubes – under legislation fluorescent tubes are now classed as hazardous waste. These, and energy saving light bulbs, can be recycled at any of the Household Recycling Centres.

G is for:

  • Garden waste – garden waste can be recycled in your brown bin or at the Household Recycling Centres. It can also be composted in your home compost bin.
  • Glass – glass bottles and jars can be recycled in your green box or in one of the glass banks across the area. You can leave the cap on glass bottles such as wine, spirits and olive oil when recycling. Sheet glass cannot be recycled at the kerbside, sheet or window glass can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres.

H is for:

I is for:

  • Inhalers – used inhalers should be returned to a pharmacy to be disposed of safely. They can be disposed of by the pharmacist with other drugs waste, this is then thermally treated to destroy the greenhouse gases. This environmentally safe disposal route is available at all pharmacies and is paid for by NHS England.

J is for:

  • Junk mail – junk mail can be placed in your blue box for recycling or in one of the paper banks across the area. Put a stop to unwanted direct mail by registering with the Mailing Preference Service at MPS Online

K is for:

  • Keys and locks – keys and locks can be recycled as scrap metal at the Household Recycling Centres.
  • Kitchen and toilet roll tubes – both can be recycled in your burgundy bin, at the Household Recycling Centres or in your home compost bin.
  • Kitchen waste – uncooked fruit and vegetable waste including peelings can be placed into your home compost bin. You could consider buying a special food waste digester which can compost all garden and kitchen food waste including cooked food, fish, bones, bread and vegetable peelings. If you are unable to compost at home this waste should be disposed of as general waste and not in your brown bin.

L is for:

  • Light bulbs – energy saving light bulbs can last up to eight times longer, use a quarter of the electricity and can be recycled at the Household Recycling Centres. Standard household light bulbs cannot be recycled because of the glass they are made from.

M is for:

  • Magazines – unwanted magazines can be recycled in your blue box or in one of the paper banks across the area.
  • Metal – metal tins and cans can be recycled in your green box or in one of the can banks across the area. Household scrap metal can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres for recycling.
  • Mobile phones –mobile phones can be presented with your kerbside boxes for recycling.

N is for:

  • Newspapers – newspapers can be recycled in your blue box or in one of the paper banks across the area.

O is for:

P is for:

  • Paper – paper can be recycled in your blue box or in one of the paper banks across the area. Shredded paper can be placed in a carrier bag or wrapped in newspaper and recycled in your blue box. Wrapping paper can also be recycled in your blue box if it passes the scrunch test (if it stays scrunched it can be recycled). Any paper with glitter will need to be disposed of in the general waste bin, along with any sticky tape.
  • Plastic – plastic bottles, pots, tubs & trays can be recycled in your burgundy bin or in the plastic banks across the area. Hard plastics are not accepted in the burgundy bin or in the plastic banks.
  • Plastic film – most major supermarkets now accept plastic film for recycling. The following plastic films can be included: carrier bags, bread bags, plastic wrappers from multipacks of cans and plastic bottles, plastic wrappers from toilet roll and kitchen towels and plastic (home delivery) magazine and newspaper wrap. Unfortunately bubble wrap, clingfilm and film lids from food trays are not accepted.
  • Polystyrene – we currently do not have any arrangements for recycling polystyrene, this should be disposed of in your general waste bin or at the Household Recycling Centres. There is a company in Scunthorpe – Moulded Foams Ltd that will accept small amounts of polystyrene from members of the public for recycling. Moulded Foams, 8/9 Abbey Court, Menasha Way, Queensway Industrial Estate, Brigg Road, DN16 3RT or call Moulded Foams on 01724 868153.
  • Printer cartridges – cartridges can be taken for recycling at some supermarkets across the area. Some charities will also accept used printer cartridges for recycling, ask in your local charity shop if they accept them. You can also take your empty printer cartridges to the Household Recycling Centres, please return your cartridge where possible with its packaging (this will help reduce damage to the cartridge).

Q is for:

R is for:

S is for:

  • Scrap metal – household scrap metal can be taken to the Household Recycling Centres for recycling or you may wish to take scrap metal directly to a scrap merchant for recycling.
  • Shoes – these should be tied in pairs and can be recycled at the Household Recycling Centres or the textile banks across the area.
  • Steel cans – steel and aluminium cans can be recycled in your green box or in one of the can banks across the area.
  • Sweet wrappers – sweet wrappers are often thought to be made of foil, however, the majority of sweet wrappers are plastic coated and cannot be recycled. Some chocolates are wrapped in foil that is not plastic coated and this material can be recycled in your green box or in one of the can banks across the area.
    Top tip – try the scrunch test to check if it is foil or plastic coated foil – if it stays scrunched it is not plastic coated foil and can be recycled.

T is for:

  • Tea lights – tea lights can be recycled in your green box or in one of the can banks around North Lincolnshire, please remove any traces of wax.
  • Tetrapak – see cartons
  • Tins – tins can be recycled in your green box or in one of the can banks across the area.
  • Toner cartridges – cartridges can be taken for recycling at some supermarkets across the area. Some charities will also accept used printer cartridges for recycling, ask in your local charity shop if they accept them. You can also take your empty printer cartridges to the Household Recycling Centres, please return your cartridge where possible with its packaging (this will help reduce damage to the cartridge).

U is for:

V is for:

  • Vegetable peelings – uncooked vegetable waste ,including peelings, can be placed into your home compost bin. If you are unable to compost at home this waste should be disposed of as general waste and not in your brown bin.

W is for:

  • Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE)
    Large and small electrical items can be taken to one of the Household Recycling Centres for recycling. Smaller electrical items that use a plug, cable or batteries can be placed on top of your kerbside boxes for recycling.
  • Wrapping paper – wrapping paper can be recycled in your blue box if it passes the scrunch test (if it stays scrunched it can be recycled). Any paper with glitter will need to be disposed of in the general waste bin, along with any sticky tape.

X is for:

Y is for:

Z is for:

Please visit our what happens next to waste and recycling for details of what happens to the contents of your bins and boxes.