North Lincolnshire Council

Flood risk management

It is agreed by many scientists that climate change will lead to the UK experiencing warmer wetter winters, hotter drier summers and more severe weather events. More frequent incidents of heavy rainfall will increase the likelihood of flooding from rivers and surface water, while rising sea levels over time will increase the risk of flooding to coastal communities. We have recently seen extreme summer rainfall events in 2007, 2008 and 2016. The number of winter storms across the UK has doubled in the last 50 years.

The Pitt Report was published in 2008 following the flood of 2007. It sets out how England and Wales could manage flood risk more effectively in the future. The Pitt Report led to new UK legislation (Flood and Water Management Act 2010) alongside European measures (Flood Risk Regulations 2009).

The Act established a national overview role for the Environment Agency, to make sure that as a nation we improve the way we approach reducing the risk of flooding and respond to floods when they happen.

The Act also established unitary and upper-tier authorities, which includes North Lincolnshire Council, as ‘lead local flood authorities’ giving them a new local leadership and coordination role in flood risk management. New duties include the management of surface water flooding, something that previously no organisation had specific responsibility for and was highlighted by Sir Michael Pitt in his report as a key issue.

Our Local Flood Risk Management Strategy sets out how we intend to manage flood risks arising from local sources.

The North Lincolnshire Flood Risk Management Board was developed following the publications of the Pitt Report and the updated UK legislation. The board ensures that all agencies responsible for managing water operate more effectively and efficiently at a local level.

Board members include:

  • North Lincolnshire Council officers and elected members
  • The Environment Agency (Anglian Region, Northern Area and Midlands Trent)
  • The five Internal Drainage Boards operating in North Lincolnshire
  • Severn Trent and Anglian Water
  • Humber Emergency Planning Service
  • Adjacent local authorities

This board structure has led to excellent working relationships resulting in a number of flood relief schemes being delivered. More details can be found in our Local Flood Risk Management Strategy.

“Flood Re” is a national scheme designed to ensure affordable flood insurance is available to those homes at the highest risk of flooding. If you are interested in finding out more about Flood Re and to see a list of brands that are currently able to provide insurance visit the Flood Re Homeowner website.

The Flood Re information leaflet [PDF, 161Kb] describes how the scheme will work for customers.

The River Humber and the Tidal River Trent are hugely important areas for the local and national economies. Around 400,000 people live around the Humber estuary alongside major industry such as power stations, refineries and ports. The Isle of Axholme contains some 28,000 properties and over 30,000 hectares of high-grade agricultural land, significant infrastructure and many businesses. The area also contains nationally and internationally important habitats.

The Environment Agency is responsible for managing flood risk from rivers and the sea.

However, the Internal Drainage Boards (IDBs) and Local Authorities also take an active part in managing flood risk through the operation and maintenance of their land and surface water drainage assets. The existing system of rivers, drainage ditches, flood defences and pumping stations work in an integrated way to both manage flood risk and drain the land.

The River Humber and the tidal River Trent are hugely important areas for the local and national economies. Around 400,000 people live around the Humber estuary alongside major industry such as power stations, refineries and ports. The Isle of Axholme contains some 28,000 properties and over 30,000 hectares of high-grade agricultural land, significant infrastructure and many businesses. The area also contains nationally and internationally important habitats.

The Environment Agency is responsible for managing flood risk from rivers and the sea.

However, the Internal Drainage Boards (IDBs) and local authorities also take an active part in managing flood risk through the operation and maintenance of their land and surface water drainage assets. The existing system of rivers, drainage ditches, flood defences and pumping stations work in an integrated way to both manage flood risk and drain the land.

The Environment Agency has committed £86m to improve defences on the Humber and the tidal Trent. The existing Humber Strategy is currently under review, and will further identify and prioritise future flood defence improvements. The Isle of Axholme Strategy has now been adopted, and sets out the management of flood risk from the Rivers Torne and Idle over the next 100 years.